Study







Background to the Parkinson's Pain study

Around 70% of patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from chronic pain. There has been relatively little research into the causes of pain in Parkinson's disease and we know very little about how to treat this symptom.

 

The aim of the Parkinson's Pain Study is to collect detailed information about pain from patients with Parkinson's disease. The study will be performed on participants who are already in either the Proband (Tracking Parkinson’s) study or the Oxford Monument Discovery Study. By combining the information in the Parkinson's Pain Study with the detailed clinical and laboratory information from these other studies we hope to learn a great deal more about the causes of pain in Parkinson's disease.

 

Only participants in either the Proband study or the Oxford Monument Discovery study are eligible for recruitment into the Parkinson's Pain Study. The Parkinson's Pain Study study is purely questionnaire-based and is done at a single visit which takes 10-20 minutes in total. This visit can be at the same time as any of the participant’s other study visits, or can be performed separately from a Proband or Oxford Discovery visit. If a participant has recently finished the Proband study they can still be recruited into the Parkinson's Pain Study at a later visit. Some participants in the Oxford Monument Discovery are control participants without Parkinson's disease. These control participants can also be recruited into the Parkinson's Pain Study so we can compare pain in people with Parkinson's disease with pain in those without the condition.

 

We already have 70 centres within the UK taking part in the Parkinson's Pain Study and hope to recruit over 1500 participants making this the largest ever in depth study of pain in Parkinson's disease.

 

The Parkinson's Pain Study is funded by Parkinson’s UK and has been adopted onto the NIHR portfolio separately from the Proband study and the Oxford Monument Discovery Study.

 

The results of this study will lead to improved treatments for this common, disabling and relatively neglected symptom in Parkinson's disease.